Posts Tagged ‘mesh’

WiFi at your event should just work

Meraki at SF BetaIt doesn’t matter how large or small the conference is, it seems like they always have WiFi problems. The networks are consistently slow, frequently fail, and usually require some arcane security measure that involve weirdly-small scraps of paper and bizarre usernames.

There’s no reason for WiFi to be this frustrating!

At Meraki, we’ve had some experience setting up WiFi at large events so we know it can be done, it’s just a matter of having the right equipment and a little know-how. We’ll give you both, for free.

We’ve started a new project to loan our enterprise-grade WiFi gear to smaller tech conferences, meetups, BarCamps, WordCamps, Tweetups, whathaveyou … for free. You provide the Internet connection, and we’ll provide a rock-solid WiFi connection. All we ask in return is that if you like our products, tell your friends, and if not, let us know how we can make them better.

We’ve just gotten started with this project, but so far, meetups like SF BetaWordCamp Boulder, and Hacks/Hackers NYC have had great experiences.

“One of the best decisions we made for our conference. Not only was the delivery and setup effortless, our network remained stable throughout the entire day. No matter your wireless needs, this experience alone tells me Meraki’s solutions are some of the best.” —WordCamp Boulder

As part of this project, we’re excited to be partnering with WordCamp.org. We’ll offer a streamlined signup process for the many BarCamp-style events that these organizations sponsor throughout the year.

If you run an event and would like to participate in our new Free Event WiFi project, we’d love it if you signed up! We’re looking for small to medium-sized events that have enough bandwidth to support that group.

If you’re interested, head on over to the signup page to learn more or take a look at our plug-and-play setup guide, or ask any questions below!

Who’s my neighbor? How to better understand your mesh in Dashboard

When you’re investigating mesh wireless issues, it’s important to know which mesh neighbors are seen by each access point (AP).  Here is a quick tutorial of how to best utilize the built-in features in Dashboard that allow you to check out who is talking to whom in the mesh and what the quality of the links are:

1. In the Dashboard, go to Monitor -> Access points.
2. Click an AP in the list.

3. Scroll down to the section Neighbors. (See screen shot below).

1-12-2010 5-20-22 PM_Neighbors
The Neighbors section reveals the mesh APs seen by the AP you’re currently looking at. Using the example above, the AP is directly communicating with four mesh neighbors: Outdoor, Indoor, MR14, and MR58. The other columns in the table provide useful information for troubleshooting wireless problems:

Dist (m)
Shows the distance from the AP to each neighbor in meters (Make sure to place the APs on the map accurately in order for these distances to be meaningful).

Radio
Describes which radio (if neighbor is a multi-radio device) of the neighbor is communicating with the AP.

Signal (dB)
Measures the received signal strength indication (RSSI) of the RF signal from the neighbor. This measurement correlates to a value in decibels (dB). For example, an RSSI of 10 is considered a very weak signal. To improve the signal: move APs closer to each other; create a better line-of-sight; consider using a more powerful antenna; eliminate RF interference; or try a different RF channel.

Fwd
Reports the percentage of packets successfully delivered from the AP to its neighbor. For example, 75% means that 3 out of every 4 packets made it to the neighbor from the AP; in other words, there’s 25% loss.  Good quality links typically will show no more than 10-15% packet loss.

Rev
Reports the percentage of packets successfully delivered from the neighbor to the AP. Good quality links will typically have no more than 10-15% packet loss.
If you don’t see a particular mesh AP in the list, that means the AP you’re looking at can’t see it. If it could, that mesh AP would be present in the Neighbors list.

Can you think of other information you’d like to see reported in the Dashboard? Let us know by entering your feedback in the “make a wish” field.

-Posted by Ahmed Akhtar

Who's my neighbor? How to better understand your mesh in Dashboard

When you’re investigating mesh wireless issues, it’s important to know which mesh neighbors are seen by each access point (AP).  Here is a quick tutorial of how to best utilize the built-in features in Dashboard that allow you to check out who is talking to whom in the mesh and what the quality of the links are:

1. In the Dashboard, go to Monitor -> Access points.
2. Click an AP in the list.

3. Scroll down to the section Neighbors. (See screen shot below).

1-12-2010 5-20-22 PM_Neighbors
The Neighbors section reveals the mesh APs seen by the AP you’re currently looking at. Using the example above, the AP is directly communicating with four mesh neighbors: Outdoor, Indoor, MR14, and MR58. The other columns in the table provide useful information for troubleshooting wireless problems:

Dist (m)
Shows the distance from the AP to each neighbor in meters (Make sure to place the APs on the map accurately in order for these distances to be meaningful).

Radio
Describes which radio (if neighbor is a multi-radio device) of the neighbor is communicating with the AP.

Signal (dB)
Measures the received signal strength indication (RSSI) of the RF signal from the neighbor. This measurement correlates to a value in decibels (dB). For example, an RSSI of 10 is considered a very weak signal. To improve the signal: move APs closer to each other; create a better line-of-sight; consider using a more powerful antenna; eliminate RF interference; or try a different RF channel.

Fwd
Reports the percentage of packets successfully delivered from the AP to its neighbor. For example, 75% means that 3 out of every 4 packets made it to the neighbor from the AP; in other words, there’s 25% loss.  Good quality links typically will show no more than 10-15% packet loss.

Rev
Reports the percentage of packets successfully delivered from the neighbor to the AP. Good quality links will typically have no more than 10-15% packet loss.
If you don’t see a particular mesh AP in the list, that means the AP you’re looking at can’t see it. If it could, that mesh AP would be present in the Neighbors list.

Can you think of other information you’d like to see reported in the Dashboard? Let us know by entering your feedback in the “make a wish” field.

-Posted by Ahmed Akhtar